What constitute bankruptcy fraud?

When you file bankruptcy, you take an oath (in 341 meeting as well) that all documents filed are filed diligently and not meant to defraud anyone. Also, within the Bankruptcy court, the officials of Trustee and the Department of Justice investigates all of the paperwork filed and can ask questions in a 341 meeting.
The latest reform of 2005 had made bankruptcy simpler and information, it can, however, be easier to forget to file many documents in Bankruptcy courts and make them subject to a formal investigation.Following is a link with the IRS which gives many examples of bankruptcy fraud.

http://www.irs.gov/compliance/enforcement/article/0,,id=213766,00.html”>http://www.irs.gov/compliance/enforcement/article/0,,id=213766,00.html

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What Are Nevada’s Bankruptcy Exemptions

State of Nevada had opted out from the exemption list of federal government. The 2005 Act substantially changed the domiciliary provision found in former section 522(2)(A). The new requirements are found in Section 522(b)(3)(A). These domiciliary requirements also determine which state law will be used to determine whether the debtor may elect to claim the federal bankruptcy exemptions.

Whether State Exemptions Laws Applies?
The state exemption law that applies to a debtor is determined by the state in which the debtor’s domicile has been located for the 730 days immediately preceding petition filing date. If the debtor’s domicile has not been located in a single state for the 730-day period, the applicable state exemption law is that of the state in which the debtor was domiciled for the 180 days immediately preceding the 730-day period, or in which the debtor was domiciled for the longer portion of such 180-day period than in any other place.

Nevada State Exemptions?
Nevada has opted out from the federal bankruptcy exemptions. The purpose of this article is only highlighting the Nevada exemptions.
Exemptions Exemption Amount Statutes
Homestead Real property or mobile home to $550,000 (husband and wife may not double)
Must record homestead declaration before filing for bankruptcy. 21.090(1) (m), 115.010
115.020

Public Benefits Aid to blind, disabled, AFDC
Industrial insurance (workers’ compensation)
Unemployment compensation
Vocational rehabilitation benefits 422.291
616.550
612.710
615.270
Personal Property Appliances, household goods, furniture, home and yard equipment to $24,000 total
Books to $10000
Burial plot purchase money held in trust
Funeral service contract money held in trust
Health aids
Keepsakes & pictures
Metal-bearing ores, geological specimens, art curiosities or paleontological remains, must be arranged, classified, catalogued & numbered in reference books
Motor vehicle to $15000; no limit if vehicle equipped to provide mobility for disabled person
One gun 21.090(1) (b)
21.090(1) (a)
452.550
689.700
21.090(1) (p)
21.090(1) (a)
21.100
21.090(1) (f), (o)
21.090(1) (i)
Tools of Trade Arms, uniforms & accouterments you’re required to keep
Cabin or dwelling of miner or prospector; cars, implements & appliances for mining claim you work to $4500 total
Farm trucks, stock, tools, equipment & seed to $4500
Library , equipment, supplies, tools & materials to $4500 21.090(1) (j)
21.090(1) (e)
21.090(1) (c)
21.090(1) (d)
Wages Minimum 75% of earned but unpaid wages; bankruptcy judge may authorize more for low income 21.090(1) (g)
Wild Card None
Insurance Annuity contract proceeds to $350 per month
Fraternal benefit society benefits
Group life or health policy or proceeds
Health proceeds or avails
Life insurance policy or proceeds if annual premiums not over $1000
Life insurance proceeds if you’re not the insured 687B.290
695A.220
687B.280
687B.270
21.090(1) (k)
687B.260
Miscellaneous Property of business partnership 87.250
Pensions ERISA-qualified benefits to $100,000
Public employees 21.090(1) (q)
286.670

How Chapter 11 Works?

– A chapter 11 case begins with the filing of a petition with the bankruptcy court serving the area where the debtor has a domicile or residence. A petition may be a voluntary petition, which is filed by the debtor, or it may be an involuntary petition, which is filed by creditors that meet certain requirements. 11 U.S.C. §§ 301, 303.

– A voluntary petition must adhere to the format of Form 1 of the Official Forms prescribed by the Judicial Conference of the United States.
– Unless the court orders otherwise, the debtor also must file with the court: (1) schedules of assets and liabilities; (2) a schedule of current income and expenditures; (3) a schedule of executory contracts and unexpired leases; and (4) a statement of financial affairs. Fed. R. Bankr. P. 1007(b).

– If the debtor is an individual (or husband and wife), there are additional document filing requirements. Such debtors must file: a certificate of credit counseling and a copy of any debt repayment plan developed through credit counseling; evidence of payment from employers, if any, received 60 days before filing; a statement of monthly net income and any anticipated increase in income or expenses after filing; and a record of any interest the debtor has in federal or state qualified education or tuition accounts.11 U.S.C. § 521.

– A husband and wife may file a joint petition or individual petitions. 11 U.S.C. § 302(a). (The Official Forms are not available from the court, but may be purchased at legal stationery stores or downloaded from the Internet at http://www.uscourts.gov/bkforms/index.html.)

– The courts are required to charge a $1,000 case filing fee and a $39 miscellaneous administrative fee. The fees must be paid to the clerk of the court upon filing or may, with the court’s permission, be paid by individual debtors in installments. 28 U.S.C. § 1930(a); Fed. R. Bankr. P. 1006(b); Bankruptcy Court Miscellaneous Fee Schedule, Item 8. Fed. R. Bankr. P. 1006(b) limits to four the number of installments for the filing fee. The final installment must be paid not later than 120 days after filing the petition.

– For cause shown, the court may extend the time of any installment, provided that the last installment is paid not later than 180 days after the filing of the petition. Fed. R. Bankr. P. 1006(b). The $39 administrative fee may be paid in installments in the same manner as the filing fee. If a joint petition is filed, only one filing fee and one administrative fee are charged. Debtors should be aware that failure to pay these fees may result in dismissal of the case. 11 U.S.C. § 1112(b)(10).

– The voluntary petition will include standard information concerning the debtor’s name(s), social security number or tax identification number, residence, location of principal assets (if a business), the debtor’s plan or intention to file a plan, and a request for relief under the appropriate chapter of the Bankruptcy Code.

– Upon filing a voluntary petition for relief under chapter 11 or, in an involuntary case, the entry of an order for relief, the debtor automatically assumes an additional identity as the “debtor in possession.” 11 U.S.C. § 1101. The term refers to a debtor that keeps possession and control of its assets while undergoing a reorganization under chapter 11, without the appointment of a case trustee. A debtor will remain a debtor in possession until the debtor’s plan of reorganization is confirmed, the debtor’s case is dismissed or converted to chapter 7, or a chapter 11 trustee is appointed.

– The appointment or election of a trustee occurs only in a small number of cases. Generally, the debtor, as “debtor in possession,” operates the business and performs many of the functions that a trustee performs in cases under other chapters. 11 U.S.C. § 1107(a).

– Generally, a written disclosure statement and a plan of reorganization must be filed with the court. 11 U.S.C. §§ 1121, 1125. The disclosure statement is a document that must contain information concerning the assets, liabilities, and business affairs of the debtor sufficient to enable a creditor to make an informed judgment about the debtor’s plan of reorganization. 11 U.S.C. § 1125. The information required is governed by judicial discretion and the circumstances of the case. In a “small business case” (discussed below) the debtor may not need to file a separate disclosure statement if the court determines that adequate information is contained in the plan. 11 U.S.C. § 1125(f).

– The contents of the plan must include a classification of claims and must specify how each class of claims will be treated under the plan. 11 U.S.C. § 1123. Creditors whose claims are “impaired,” i.e., those whose contractual rights are to be modified or who will be paid less than the full value of their claims under the plan, vote on the plan by ballot. 11 U.S.C. § 1126. After the disclosure statement is approved by the court and the ballots are collected and tallied, the court will conduct a confirmation hearing to determine whether to confirm the plan. 11 U.S.C. § 1128.

– In the case of individuals, chapter 11 bears some similarities to chapter 13. For example, property of the estate for an individual debtor includes the debtor’s earnings and property acquired by the debtor after filing until the case is closed, dismissed or converted; funding of the plan may be from the debtor’s future earnings; and the plan cannot be confirmed over a creditor’s objection without committing all of the debtor’s disposable income over five years unless the plan pays the claim in full, with interest, over a shorter period of time. 11 U.S.C. §§ 1115, 1123(a)(8), 1129(a)(15).

What is the role of a Bankruptcy Trustee?

As we know that in every case of chapter 7 or chapter 13, a trustee is appointed by the US trustee. If there is an estate, there shall be a trustee. The trustee’s basic role is to represent the interests of the unsecured creditors. The trustee’s duties in carrying out this role are provided in the statutes. Invariably, they include collecting property of the estate, invaliding certain transfers made from the estate by the debtors, objection to exemptions, objection to discharge, liquidating any nonexempt property and distributing it to creditors with valid claims. Finally, trustee makes a final accounting of all of the estate and its distribution to the United States trustee. The trustee also sends claims for domestic supports obligations.

The trustee duties are limited in a typical chapter 7 case as there may not be many assets. However, trustee evaluates schedules, statements, and exemption claims.

The trustee also participates and presides over meetings of creditors and determines whether to file objections or discharge. Both chapter 13 and chapter 7 trustees are accountable for the performance of their statutory duties and may generally be held liable for failure to perform them. Bankruptcy trustees are not judicial officers and they cannot resolve disputed issues. The trustee cannot be your friend or a foe, as he is impartial and should decide according to the merits of each case.

Here comes the revised Means Test Figures

Revised Means Test Figures, effective May 1st, 2012

The Census Bureau figures, IRS Data and Administrative Expenses Multipliers for Form 22 are revised effective May 1st, 2012. After updating Best Case Bankruptcy, users can view the new figures in the program by changing the expected filing date to May 1st, 2012 or later on the General tab in Form 22. Visit the U.S. Trustee’s Means Testing website for more information regarding the revisions. This update is available for immediate download. For a comparison of the old numbers to the revised numbers, please see the following table.

NV Means Test Tables – Effective 05/01/2012 – with change from 11/01/2011 State: NV Nevada (32)

Median Income – Living Allowance – Health Allowance – Transportation Allowance – Administrative Multiplier
Nevada Census Median Income Effective 05/01/2012

Period 1 Person 2 People 3 People 4 People 5 People 6 People 7 People 8 People Add’l
Year $44,508 $57,327 $62,776 $67,236 $74,736 $82,236 $89,736 $97,236 $7,500
6 Months $22,254 $28,664 $31,388 $33,618 $37,368 $41,118 $44,868 $48,618 $3,750
Month $3,709 $4,777 $5,231 $5,603 $6,228 $6,853 $7,478 $8,103 $625
SemiMth $1,855 $2,389 $2,616 $2,802 $3,114 $3,427 $3,739 $4,052 $313
BiWeek $1,712 $2,205 $2,414 $2,586 $2,874 $3,163 $3,451 $3,740 $288
Week $856 $1,102 $1,207 $1,293 $1,437 $1,581 $1,726 $1,870 $144
Median Income Change Between 05/01/2012 and 11/01/2011

Period 1 Person 2 People 3 People 4 People 5 People 6 People 7 People 8 People Add’l
Year +1,362 3% +1,754 3% +1,921 3% +2,057 3% +2,057 3% +2,057 3% +2,057 2% +2,057 2% 0 0%
6 Months +681 3% +877 3% +960 3% +1,028 3% +1,028 3% +1,028 3% +1,028 2% +1,028 2% 0 0%
Month +113 3% +146 3% +160 3% +171 3% +171 3% +171 3% +171 2% +171 2% 0 0%
SemiMth +57 3% +73 3% +80 3% +86 3% +86 3% +86 3% +86 2% +86 2% 0 0%
BiWeek +53 3% +68 3% +73 3% +79 3% +79 3% +79 3% +79 2% +79 2% 0 0%
Week +26 3% +33 3% +37 3% +40 3% +39 3% +39 3% +40 2% +40 2% 0 0%

National Living Allowance Effective 05/01/2012

Type 1 Person 2 People 3 People 4 People 5 People 6 People 7 People 8 People Add’l
Food $301 $537 $639 $765 $913 $1,062 $1,210 $1,359 $196
Housekeeping $30 $66 $65 $74 $88 $102 $116 $131 $0
Apparel $86 $162 $209 $244 $292 $339 $387 $434 $0
Personal Care $32 $55 $63 $67 $79 $92 $105 $118 $0
Miscellaneous $116 $209 $251 $300 $359 $417 $475 $532 $85
Total $565 $1,029 $1,227 $1,450 $1,731 $2,012 $2,293 $2,574 $281

National Living Change Between 05/01/2012 and 11/01/2011

Type 1 Person 2 People 3 People 4 People 5 People 6 People 7 People 8 People Add’l
Food +1 0% 0 0% 0 0% +8 1% +13 1% +18 2% +22 2% +28 2% +6 3%
Housekeeping +1 3% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% +1 1% 0 0%
Apparel 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% +1 0% +2 1% +4 1% +4 1% 0 0%
Personal Care 0 0% 0 0% +2 3% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
Miscellaneous +29 33% +44 27% +54 27% +65 28% +78 28% +91 28% +104 28% +116 28% +13 18%
Total +31 6% +44 4% +56 5% +73 5% +92 6% +111 6% +130 6% +149 6% +19 7%

National Health Allowance Effective 05/01/2012

Allowance Change from 11/01/2011
Under Age 65 Age 65 & Over Under Age 65 Age 65 & Over
$60 $144 0 0% 0 0%

Local Housing Allowance Effective 05/01/2012

Allowance Change from 11/01/2011
County FIPS Type 1 Person 2 people 3 people 4 people 5 people 1 Prs 2 Ppl 3 Ppl 4 Ppl 5 Ppl
Carson City 32510 Utility $426 $501 $528 $588 $598 +33 8% +40 9% +42 9% +46 8% +47 9%
Mortgage $1,141 $1,340 $1,412 $1,575 $1,600 +52 5% +60 5% +64 5% +72 5% +73 5%
Total $1,567 $1,841 $1,940 $2,163 $2,198 +85 6% +100 6% +106 6% +118 6% +120 6%
Churchill 32001 Utility $423 $497 $524 $584 $594 +1 0% +2 0% +2 0% +2 0% +3 1%
Mortgage $872 $1,024 $1,079 $1,203 $1,222 +64 8% +75 8% +79 8% +88 8% +89 8%
Total $1,295 $1,521 $1,603 $1,787 $1,816 +65 5% +77 5% +81 5% +90 5% +92 5%
Clark 32003 Utility $431 $506 $533 $594 $604 +15 4% +18 4% +19 4% +21 4% +21 4%
Mortgage $1,299 $1,526 $1,608 $1,793 $1,822 +66 5% +78 5% +82 5% +91 5% +93 5%
Total $1,730 $2,032 $2,141 $2,387 $2,426 +81 5% +96 5% +101 5% +112 5% +114 5%
Douglas 32005 Utility $446 $524 $552 $616 $625 +19 4% +23 5% +24 5% +27 5% +26 4%
Mortgage $1,375 $1,615 $1,701 $1,897 $1,928 +101 8% +118 8% +124 8% +139 8% +142 8%
Total $1,821 $2,139 $2,253 $2,513 $2,553 +120 7% +141 7% +148 7% +166 7% +168 7%
Elko 32007 Utility $479 $563 $594 $662 $672 +2 0% +3 1% +4 1% +4 1% +4 1%
Mortgage $887 $1,041 $1,097 $1,223 $1,243 +44 5% +50 5% +53 5% +59 5% +60 5%
Total $1,366 $1,604 $1,691 $1,885 $1,915 +46 3% +53 3% +57 3% +63 3% +64 3%
Esmeralda 32009 Utility $580 $681 $718 $800 $813 +71 14% +83 14% +88 14% +98 14% +100 14%
Mortgage $469 $551 $580 $647 $657 -71 -13% -83 -13% -88 -13% -98 -13% -100 -13%
Total $1,049 $1,232 $1,298 $1,447 $1,470 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
Eureka 32011 Utility $442 $518 $546 $609 $619 +14 3% +15 3% +16 3% +18 3% +19 3%
Mortgage $659 $775 $816 $910 $924 -14 -2% -15 -2% -16 -2% -18 -2% -19 -2%
Total $1,101 $1,293 $1,362 $1,519 $1,543 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
Humboldt 32013 Utility $497 $583 $615 $685 $696 -16 -3% -20 -3% -21 -3% -24 -3% -24 -3%
Mortgage $796 $936 $986 $1,100 $1,117 +16 2% +20 2% +21 2% +24 2% +24 2%
Total $1,293 $1,519 $1,601 $1,785 $1,813 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
Lander 32015 Utility $493 $579 $610 $680 $691 +23 5% +27 5% +28 5% +31 5% +32 5%
Mortgage $692 $812 $856 $955 $970 -23 -3% -27 -3% -28 -3% -31 -3% -32 -3%
Total $1,185 $1,391 $1,466 $1,635 $1,661 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
Lincoln 32017 Utility $363 $426 $449 $501 $509 +31 9% +36 9% +38 9% +43 9% +43 9%
Mortgage $744 $874 $921 $1,026 $1,043 +96 15% +113 15% +120 15% +132 15% +135 15%
Total $1,107 $1,300 $1,370 $1,527 $1,552 +127 13% +149 13% +158 13% +175 13% +178 13%
Lyon 32019 Utility $441 $518 $546 $608 $618 +11 3% +13 3% +14 3% +14 2% +15 2%
Mortgage $967 $1,136 $1,197 $1,335 $1,356 +82 9% +96 9% +101 9% +114 9% +115 9%
Total $1,408 $1,654 $1,743 $1,943 $1,974 +93 7% +109 7% +115 7% +128 7% +130 7%
Mineral 32021 Utility $400 $470 $495 $552 $561 +32 9% +37 9% +39 9% +44 9% +45 9%
Mortgage $598 $702 $740 $825 $838 +117 24% +138 24% +146 25% +162 24% +164 24%
Total $998 $1,172 $1,235 $1,377 $1,399 +149 18% +175 18% +185 18% +206 18% +209 18%
Nye 32023 Utility $425 $499 $526 $586 $596 +6 1% +7 1% +8 2% +8 1% +9 2%
Mortgage $814 $956 $1,007 $1,123 $1,141 +57 8% +66 7% +69 7% +78 7% +78 7%
Total $1,239 $1,455 $1,533 $1,709 $1,737 +63 5% +73 5% +77 5% +86 5% +87 5%
Pershing 32027 Utility $429 $504 $531 $592 $602 -30 -7% -35 -6% -37 -7% -41 -6% -41 -6%
Mortgage $715 $840 $885 $987 $1,003 +30 4% +36 4% +37 4% +42 4% +42 4%
Total $1,144 $1,344 $1,416 $1,579 $1,605 0 0% +1 0% 0 0% +1 0% +1 0%
Storey 32029 Utility $432 $507 $535 $596 $606 +32 8% +37 8% +40 8% +44 8% +45 8%
Mortgage $1,018 $1,196 $1,260 $1,405 $1,428 +1 0% +1 0% +1 0% +1 0% +1 0%
Total $1,450 $1,703 $1,795 $2,001 $2,034 +33 2% +38 2% +41 2% +45 2% +46 2%
Washoe 32031 Utility $452 $531 $559 $624 $633 +17 4% +20 4% +21 4% +24 4% +23 4%
Mortgage $1,327 $1,558 $1,642 $1,831 $1,861 +69 5% +81 5% +85 5% +95 5% +97 5%
Total $1,779 $2,089 $2,201 $2,455 $2,494 +86 5% +101 5% +106 5% +119 5% +120 5%
White Pine 32033 Utility $378 $444 $467 $521 $530 +1 0% +2 0% +1 0% +1 0% +2 0%
Mortgage $740 $869 $916 $1,021 $1,037 +47 7% +54 7% +57 7% +64 7% +64 7%
Total $1,118 $1,313 $1,383 $1,542 $1,567 +48 4% +56 4% +58 4% +65 4% +66 4%

National Ownership and Local Operating Transportation Allowance Effective 05/01/2012

Allowance Change from 11/01/2011
County Region Type No Car 1 Car 2 Cars No Car 1 Car 2 Cars
All NV Counties WE Operating $182 $236 $472 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
Ownership $0 $517 $1,034 0 0% +21 4% +42 4%
Total $182 $753 $1,506 0 0% +21 3% +42 3%

Administrative Expenses Multiplier Effective 05/01/2012

Judicial District Code Admin Multiplier Change from 11/01/2011
Nevada – All NV-A 6.50% -2.10

The automatic stay and its wider implications.

We have been asked many times from our clients about automatic stay, and we had discussed this matter in our blog also, But the questions are coming so often and the law has been changing, that we feel obligations to revisit this issue again.
The filing of a petition either voluntary or involuntary invokes the automatic stay. This as you may know is an umbrella against all kinds of collections and activities, and stops them right in their making. The automatic stay applies to all entities and is intended to protect the debtor and the estate.The stay acts to enjoin all efforts to collect on any debts, to take possession of collateral, to enforce or create a line, or to set off a debt against the debtor.
Bankruptcy Code Section 362(a) is very inclusive and provides that the filing of a voluntary or involuntary petition acts as a stay applicable to all entities and prohibits the following types of acts:

1. The commencement or continuation, including the issuance or employment of process, of a judicial, administrative, or other action or proceeding against the debtor that was or could have been commenced before the commencement of the case under this title, or to recover a claim against the debtor that arose before the commencement of the case under the Bankruptcy Code.
2. The enforcement, against the debtor or against the property of the estate;
3. Any act to obtain possession of property of the estate or of property from the estate or to exercise control over property of the estate.
4. Any act to create, perfect, or enforce any line against property of the estate;
5. Any act to create, perfect, or enforce against property of the debtor any line to the extent that such lien secures a claim that arose before the commencement of the case under the Bankruptcy Code;
6. Any act to collect, assess, or recover a claim against the debtor that arose before the commencement of the case under the Code;
7. The setoff of any debt owing to the debtor that arose before the commencement of the case under this title against any claim against the debtor.
8. Any proceeding before the US Tax Court.

What actions are not stayed?
1. Criminal proceedings;
2. Enforcement of domestic support obligations;
3. Action to perfect or maintain a purchase money security interest;
4. Enforcement of governmental regulatory and police power;
5. Setoff of mutual debts by certain creditors;
6. Eviction
(a) a landlord may continue any eviction or unlawful detainer action against the debtor if the landlord had already obtained judgment for possession of the debtor’s rented residence before the bankruptcy petition is filed.
(b) the landlord may continue any eviction action against the debtor seeking possession of the debtor’s residence if that action is based on “endangermerment” of the real estate property.

What are the penalties for violation of the stay?

-Punitive damag4es, fees, costs and contempt of court

What a Bankruptcy Discharge Means under Chapter 7?

The bankruptcy court grants a discharge to the person named as debtor. However, it should not be treated as dismissal which has entirely different meaning.
The collection of discharged debts are prohibited.
The discharge prohibits any attempt to collect from the debtor a debt that has been discharged. For example, a creditor is not permitted to contact a debtor:
– by mail,
– by phone,
– or otherwise,
– to file or continue a lawsuit,
– to attach wages or other property,
– or to take any other action collect a discharged debt from the debtor.
There are also special rules that protect certain community property owned by the debtor’s spouse, even if that spouse did not file a bankruptcy case.

What is the punishment?
A creditor who violates this order can be required to pay damages and attorney’s fees to the debtor including of course a contempt of court from the bankruptcy court. This, however, should not be mixed up with a creditor’s valid lien which was not avoided or eliminated in the bankruptcy case. Despite all this, a debtor may voluntarily pay his debts that has been discharged.

Debts that are discharged.
The chapter 7 discharge order eliminates a debtor’s legal obligation to pay a debt that is discharged. Most, but not all, types of debts are discharged if the debt existed on the date the bankruptcy case was filed.

Debts that are not discharged.
Let us discuss debts which cannot discharged. Here is a laundry list of these debts:
1. Debts for most taxes.
2. Debts incurred to pay nondischargeable taxes;
4. Debts that are domestic support obligations;
5. Debts for most student loans;
6. Debts for most fines, penalties, forfeitures, or criminal restitution obligations;
7. Debts for personal injuries or death caused by the debtor’s operation of a motor vehicle, vessel, or aircraft while intoxicated.;
8. Some debts which were not properly listed by the debtor;
9. Debts that the bankruptcy court specifically has decided or will decide in this bankruptcy case are not discharged;
10. Debts for which debtor has given up the discharge protection by signing a reaffirmation agreement in compliance with the Bankruptcy Code requirements for reaffirmation of debts; and
11. Debts owed to certain pension, profit sharing, stock bonus, other retirement plans, or to the Thrift Savings Plan for federal employees for certain types of loans from these plans.

The law is complex, and it is always good to talk to a Nevada licensed attorney.